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History

All Our Kin began as a response to the ramifications of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 on low-income families, especially single mothers of very young children who struggled to find both decent work and affordable high-quality child care in their communities. 

All Our Kin’s response to these negative outcomes for families was to invest in the community’s women, giving them the resources and training to open their own community-based family child cares. As professionals and business owners, women find meaningful work, and also become sources of support and strength for the families they serve. Most importantly, they provide our youngest and most vulnerable children with quality early learning experiences.

All Our Kin is the only organization in Connecticut—and one of a handful in the country—to address both workforce development and child care simultaneously. We train and support over 250 parents and educators each year, who in turn serve nearly 1,500 children. We work with a diverse group of primarily low-income parents and providers from a range of neighborhoods and towns. Ninety-eight percent of the providers and parents we serve are female; they range in age from 18 to 70. Approximately 35% are African-American, 60% are Latina, and 5% are white or other ethnicities. All Our Kin works directly with the providers serving our lowest-income children: 72% of the children in their care qualify for Care4Kids subsidies, state funding only available to low-income working families and families on public assistance.